Proactive sustainable university transportation? Marginal effects, intrinsic values and university students' mode choice

Zhou, Jiangping (2016) Proactive sustainable university transportation? Marginal effects, intrinsic values and university students' mode choice. International Journal of Sustainable Transportation, 10 9: 815-824. doi:10.1080/15568318.2016.1159357


Author Zhou, Jiangping
Title Proactive sustainable university transportation? Marginal effects, intrinsic values and university students' mode choice
Journal name International Journal of Sustainable Transportation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-8318
1556-8334
Publication date 2016-03-11
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15568318.2016.1159357
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 10
Issue 9
Start page 815
End page 824
Total pages 46
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In the US, millions of university students drive alone to school. Therefore, decreasing driving alone and related car dependence among university students is as important as doing that among the general employee. But how can we prioritize resources allocated to different possible and alternative actions? This article completes a case study to systematically single out different factors that influence university students’ mode choice and quantify their marginal effects, which are regarded as important references for prioritizing actions. Los Angeles, a place notorious for its car dominance is chosen as the site of the case study. It is argued that if we could succeed in promoting non-driving-alone (NDA) modes therein, we should be able to do it elsewhere, at least in the US context. Based on statistical analyses and multinomial logit models, it finds that: (a) Access to bus services and a subsidized transit pass can boost the usage of NDA modes; (b) Commute time is significantly associated with the probability of using transit and a long commute time by transit does not necessarily reduce transit's utilities or intrinsic values; (c) Male and/or undergraduate students are more likely to bike or walk to the campus than other students; (d) The top three factors that have the greatest marginal effects on mode choice are: ownership of a subsidized transit pass, status (graduate vs. undergraduate) and gender. The above have provided important policy implications for designing and prioritizing mode-sensitive programs to promote the usage of NDA modes among university students.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
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Created: Fri, 11 Mar 2016, 10:58:16 EST by Jiangping Zhou on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management