Hemodynamic effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, a crossover randomized trial

Beker, Friederike, Rogerson, Sheryle R., Hooper, Stuart B., Sehgal, Arvind and Davis, Peter G. (2015) Hemodynamic effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, a crossover randomized trial. Journal of Pediatrics, 166 2: 477-479. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.10.019


Author Beker, Friederike
Rogerson, Sheryle R.
Hooper, Stuart B.
Sehgal, Arvind
Davis, Peter G.
Title Hemodynamic effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, a crossover randomized trial
Journal name Journal of Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3476
1097-6833
Publication date 2015-02
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.10.019
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 166
Issue 2
Start page 477
End page 479
Total pages 3
Place of publication Philadelphia, United States
Publisher Mosby
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Previous studies suggest that high airway pressure may compromise cardiac output. We investigated the effect of 3 nasal continuous positive airway pressure levels on cardiac output in preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease. We found that brief changes in continuous positive airway pressure did not affect cardiac output.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 09 Mar 2016, 15:16:34 EST by Friederike Beker on behalf of Paediatrics & Child Health - Mater Hospital