Traditional aboriginal preparation alters the chemical profile of carica papaya leaves and impacts on cytotoxicity towards human squamous cell carcinoma

Nguyen, Thao T., Parat, Marie-Odile, Shaw, Paul N., Hewavitharana, Amitha K. and Hodson, Mark P. (2016) Traditional aboriginal preparation alters the chemical profile of carica papaya leaves and impacts on cytotoxicity towards human squamous cell carcinoma. PLoS ONE, 11 2: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0147956


Author Nguyen, Thao T.
Parat, Marie-Odile
Shaw, Paul N.
Hewavitharana, Amitha K.
Hodson, Mark P.
Title Traditional aboriginal preparation alters the chemical profile of carica papaya leaves and impacts on cytotoxicity towards human squamous cell carcinoma
Formatted title
Traditional aboriginal preparation alters the chemical profile of carica papaya leaves and impacts on cytotoxicity towards human squamous cell carcinoma
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2016-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147956
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 2
Total pages 15
Place of publication San Francisco, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Carica papaya leaf decoction, an Australian Aboriginal remedy, has been used widely for its healing capabilities against cancer, with numerous anecdotal reports. In this study we investigated its in vitro cytotoxicity on human squamous cell carcinoma cells followed by metabolomic profiling of Carica papaya leaf decoction and leaf juice/brewed leaf juice to determine the effects imparted by the long heating process typical of the Aboriginal remedy preparation. MTT assay results showed that in comparison with the decoction, the leaf juice not only exhibited a stronger cytotoxic effect on SCC25 cancer cells, but also produced a significant cancer-selective effect as shown by tests on non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Furthermore, evidence from testing brewed leaf juice on these two cell lines suggested that the brewing process markedly reduced the selective effect of Carica papaya leaf on SCC25 cancer cells. To tentatively identify the compounds that contribute to the distinct selective anticancer activity of leaf juice, an untargeted metabolomic approach employing Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry followed by multivariate data analysis was applied. Some 90 and 104 peaks in positive and negative mode respectively were selected as discriminatory features from the chemical profile of leaf juice and >1500 putative compound IDs were obtained via database searching. Direct comparison of chromatographic and tandem mass spectral data to available reference compounds confirmed one feature as a match with its proposed authentic standard, namely pheophorbide A. However, despite pheophorbide A exhibiting cytotoxic activity on SCC25 cancer cells, it did not prove to be the compound contributing principally to the selective activity of leaf juice. With promising results suggesting stronger and more selective anticancer effects when compared to the Aboriginal remedy, Carica papaya leaf juice warrants further study to explore its activity on other cancer cell lines, as well as investigation to confirm the identity of compounds contributing to its selective effect, particularly those compounds altered by the long heating process applied during the traditional Aboriginal remedy preparation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Pharmacy Publications
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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