Maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring trajectories of height and adiposity: comparing maternal and paternal associations

Howe, Laura D., Matijasevich, Alicia, Tilling, Kate, Brion, Marie-Jo, Leary, Sam D., Smith, George Davey and Lawlor, Debbie A. (2012) Maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring trajectories of height and adiposity: comparing maternal and paternal associations. International Journal of Epidemiology, 41 3: 722-732. doi:10.1093/ije/dys025


Author Howe, Laura D.
Matijasevich, Alicia
Tilling, Kate
Brion, Marie-Jo
Leary, Sam D.
Smith, George Davey
Lawlor, Debbie A.
Title Maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring trajectories of height and adiposity: comparing maternal and paternal associations
Journal name International Journal of Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-5771
1464-3685
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ije/dys025
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Issue 3
Start page 722
End page 732
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with reduced offspring birth length and has been postulated as a risk factor for obesity. Causality for obesity is not established. Causality is well-supported for birth length, but evidence on persistence of height deficits is inconsistent.

Methods We examined the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and trajectories of offspring height (0–10 years, N = 9424), ponderal index (PI) (0–2 years, N = 9321) and body mass index (BMI) (2–10 years, N = 8887) in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. To strengthen inference, measured confounders were controlled for, maternal and partner smoking associations were compared, dose–response and associations with post-natal smoking were examined.

Results Maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with shorter birth length, faster height growth in infancy and slower growth in later childhood. By 10 years, daughters of women who smoke during pregnancy are on average 1.11 cm (SE = 0.27) shorter after adjustment for confounders and partner smoking; the difference is 0.22 cm (SE = 0.22) for partner's smoking. Maternal smoking was associated with lower PI at birth, faster PI increase in infancy, but not with BMI changes 2–10 years. Associations were stronger for maternal than partner smoking for PI at birth and PI changes in infancy, but not for BMI changes after 2 years. A similar dose–response in both maternal and partner smoking was seen for BMI change 2–10 years.

Conclusion Maternal smoking during pregnancy has an intrauterine effect on birth length, and possibly on adiposity at birth and changes in height and adiposity in infancy. We do not find evidence of a specific intrauterine effect on height or adiposity changes after the age of 2 years.
Keyword Smoking
Growth
Obesity
Pregnancy
Child
ALSPAC
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Biological Sciences Publications
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
UQ Diamantina Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 30 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Mar 2016, 15:06:13 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences