Fifty shades flipped: effects of reading erotica depicting a sexually dominant woman compared to a sexually dominant man

Harris, Emily Ann, Thai, Michael and Barlow, Fiona Kate (2016) Fifty shades flipped: effects of reading erotica depicting a sexually dominant woman compared to a sexually dominant man. Journal of Sex Research, 1-12. doi:10.1080/00224499.2015.1131227


Author Harris, Emily Ann
Thai, Michael
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Title Fifty shades flipped: effects of reading erotica depicting a sexually dominant woman compared to a sexually dominant man
Journal name Journal of Sex Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1559-8519
0022-4499
Publication date 2016-02-02
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00224499.2015.1131227
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The present study examined the effects of reading submission- and dominance-themed erotica on attitudes toward women and rape, ideal partner preferences, and subjective sexual arousal. Heterosexual male (n = 241) and female (n = 240) participants read one of three erotic stories depicting male dominance, female dominance, or no dominance, or a fourth nonerotic control story. First, we found that after reading about a sexually dominant man, women reported increased benevolent sexism compared to men, and men reported increased rape myth acceptance compared to women. Second, men and women showed a similar level of preference for partner dominance after reading about a sexually dominant woman. This was in contrast to the typical pattern revealed in all other conditions, whereby women were more likely to favor dominant partners relative to men. Finally, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the story describing male dominance would be the most arousing. Rather, all three erotic stories were equally sexually arousing compared to the control condition, and men and women did not differ in the extent to which the erotic stories aroused them. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Keyword Erotic stories
Sexually dominant man
Sexually dominant woman
Social cognitive theory
SCT
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 01 Mar 2016, 00:40:08 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)