Introducing solid foods using baby-led weaning vs. spoon-feeding: a focus on oral development, nutrient intake and quality of research to bring balance to the debate

Cichero J.A.Y. (2016) Introducing solid foods using baby-led weaning vs. spoon-feeding: a focus on oral development, nutrient intake and quality of research to bring balance to the debate. Nutrition Bulletin, 41 1: 72-77. doi:10.1111/nbu.12191


Author Cichero J.A.Y.
Title Introducing solid foods using baby-led weaning vs. spoon-feeding: a focus on oral development, nutrient intake and quality of research to bring balance to the debate
Journal name Nutrition Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1467-3010
1471-9827
Publication date 2016-03-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/nbu.12191
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Issue 1
Start page 72
End page 77
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract The World Health Organization recommends that infants be introduced to first solid foods from 6 months of age to complement milk feeds. The introduction of complementary foods is required to help infants meet their changing nutritional requirements. In recent years, baby-led weaning and spoon-feeding have been discussed as mutually exclusive approaches to introducing first solids. Baby-led weaning advocates that babies direct and control the process of weaning, deciding what they will eat, how much and how quickly. There is an emphasis on parents providing chunks of soft food that babies can pick up and chew. A traditional spoon-feeding approach involves introducing smooth runny purees as the texture for first foods and progressing to chewable solids as oral motor skills develop. Spoon-feeding provides an opportunity for infants to develop oral skills necessary for safe management of solids and may facilitate intake of iron-rich foods at weaning, whilst baby-led weaning promotes greater participation in family meals and exposure to family foods. The need to supervise infants whilst eating to avoid risk of choking on food is required for both approaches. The review highlights the need for quality, well-designed research on different approaches to the introduction of first solid foods and suggests that a combined approach to baby-led weaning should be considered.
Keyword Baby-led weaning
Chewing
Choking
Complimentary foods
Premature infants
Spoon-feeding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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