Kinship care: an exploration of the practice issues encountered by Queensland child protection practitioners

Nash, Jennifer M. (2010). Kinship care: an exploration of the practice issues encountered by Queensland child protection practitioners Other, School of Social Work and Human Services, The University of Queensland.

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Author Nash, Jennifer M.
Thesis Title Kinship care: an exploration of the practice issues encountered by Queensland child protection practitioners
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Work and Human Services
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Other
Open Access Status Other
Supervisor Yvonne Darlington
Total pages 73
Language eng
Subjects 160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Mirroring international and interstate trends, the formalised use of kinship care for children in the child protection system has grown in Queensland in response to growing numbers of children in care and an inadequate pool of foster carers. There is a growing body of evidence supporting the benefits of kinship care for children including enhanced placement stability and child well-being. Legislators have embraced this paradigm shift, enshrining kinship care as the preferred form of care for children unable to live with their parents, whether temporarily or permanently. In practice, the utilization of kinship care in Queensland is not optimal, with two thirds of children in care still living with unrelated foster carers. In this study, practice issues experienced by child protection practitioners are explored to understand how the resource of kinship care may be further enhanced. Findings indicate that while practitioners believe kinship care to be beneficial for most children, a haphazard approach to family exploration work has resulted in many children drifting from temporary to permanent foster care arrangements. A more strategic approach toward recruitment, assessment, support and training is required for kinship carers, and as 'family', kinship carers need the opportunity to participate actively in case planning and therapeutic processes. Practitioners need advanced training to strengthen their understanding of the complexities of kinship family dynamics, to assist them to work confidently with kin carers and parents toward the best permanency outcomes for children.
Keyword Family social work
Child welfare -- Queensland
Additional Notes The Research Project is submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the Master of Social Work

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - Open Access
 
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Created: Mon, 29 Feb 2016, 14:54:42 EST by Ms Christine Heslehurst on behalf of The University of Queensland Library