How to measure home blood pressure: recommendations for healthcare professionals and patients

Sharman, James E., Howes, Faline S., Head, Geoffrey A., McGrath, Barry P., Stowasser, Michael, Schlaich, Markus, Glasziou, Paul and Nelson, Mark R. (2016) How to measure home blood pressure: recommendations for healthcare professionals and patients. Australian Family Physician, 45 1: 31-34.

Author Sharman, James E.
Howes, Faline S.
Head, Geoffrey A.
McGrath, Barry P.
Stowasser, Michael
Schlaich, Markus
Glasziou, Paul
Nelson, Mark R.
Title How to measure home blood pressure: recommendations for healthcare professionals and patients
Journal name Australian Family Physician   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-8495
Publication date 2016-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 45
Issue 1
Start page 31
End page 34
Total pages 4
Place of publication East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the self-measurement of BP in the home environment. It is complementary to 24-hour ambulatory BP, for better diagnosis and management of patients with high BP. Home BP monitoring is in widespread use, but variation in monitoring protocols could lead to inaccurate assessment of BP.

Objective: The aim of this article is to provide a practical guide (with resources) for patients and doctors on how to measure home BP according to a standardised, evidence-based protocol.

Discussion: Home BP should be measured using a validated, automatic BP device (preferably with memory storage), using an appropriately sized upper arm cuff. Measurements should be taken after five minutes of seated rest and before medication, food or vigorous exercise. BP should be recorded for seven days (five days minimum) in the morning and evening (two readings each). Overall, home BP is the average systolic and diastolic BP over seven days (excluding the first day); an average of ≥135/85 mmHg is indicative of hypertension.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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