Neighborhood social ties and shared expectations for informal social control: do they influence informal social control actions?

Wickes, Rebecca, Hipp, John R., Sargeant, Elise and Mazerolle, Lorraine (2016) Neighborhood social ties and shared expectations for informal social control: do they influence informal social control actions?. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, . doi:10.1007/s10940-016-9285-x


Author Wickes, Rebecca
Hipp, John R.
Sargeant, Elise
Mazerolle, Lorraine
Title Neighborhood social ties and shared expectations for informal social control: do they influence informal social control actions?
Journal name Journal of Quantitative Criminology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0748-4518
1573-7799
Publication date 2016-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10940-016-9285-x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 29
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2017
Formatted abstract
Objectives Social disorganization states that neighborhood social ties and shared expectations for informal social control are necessary for the exercise of informal social control actions. Yet this association is largely assumed rather than empirically examined in the literature. This paper examines the relationship between neighborhood social ties, shared expectations for informal social control and actual parochial and public informal social control actions taken by residents in response to big neighborhood problems.
Methods Using multi-level logistic regression models, we integrate Australian Bureau of Statistics census data with the Australian Community Capacity Study survey data of 1310 residents reporting 2614 significant neighborhood problems across 148 neighborhoods to examine specific informal social control actions taken by residents when faced with neighborhood problems.
Results We do not find a relationship between shared expectations for informal social control and residents’ informal social control actions. Individual social ties, however, do lead to an increase in informal social control actions in response to ‘big’ neighborhood problems. Residents with strong ties are more likely to engage in public and parochial informal social control actions than those individuals who lack social ties. Yet individuals living in neighborhoods with high levels of social ties are only moderately more likely to engage in parochial informal social control action than those living in areas where these ties are not present. Shared expectations for informal social control are not associated with the likelihood that residents engage in informal social control actions when faced with a significant neighborhood problem.
Conclusion Neighborhood social ties and shared expectations for informal social control are not unilaterally necessary for the exercise of informal social control actions. Our results challenge contemporary articulations of social disorganization theory that assume that the availability of neighborhood social ties or expectations for action are associated with residents actually doing something to exercise of informal social control.
Keyword Informal social control
Collective efficacy
Social ties
Community
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
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Created: Thu, 25 Feb 2016, 17:11:59 EST by Dr Rebecca Wickes on behalf of School of Social Science