State-building and primitive accumulation in Solomon Islands: the unintended consequences of risk mitigation at the frontiers of global capitalist expansion

Hameiri, Shahar (2014). State-building and primitive accumulation in Solomon Islands: the unintended consequences of risk mitigation at the frontiers of global capitalist expansion. In Toby Carroll and Darryl S. L. Jarvis (Ed.), The politics of marketising Asia (pp. 101-117) Basingstoke, United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan. doi:10.1057/9781137001672_5


Author Hameiri, Shahar
Title of chapter State-building and primitive accumulation in Solomon Islands: the unintended consequences of risk mitigation at the frontiers of global capitalist expansion
Title of book The politics of marketising Asia
Place of Publication Basingstoke, United Kingdom
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Publication Year 2014
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1057/9781137001672_5
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Series Studies in the Political Economy of Public Policy
ISBN 9781349433650
9781137001672
Editor Toby Carroll
Darryl S. L. Jarvis
Chapter number 5
Start page 101
End page 117
Total pages 17
Total chapters 12
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Primitive accumulation — the, often forced, separation of direct producers from their means of production and their subsequent proletarianisation — has concerned political economists since Karl Marx’s days. In Marx’s understanding, primitive accumulation was a nasty, though necessary, precondition to capitalist development in that it created private property where none had previously existed. It also, however, created the working class, which Marx saw as the progressive agent of historical transformation to socialism. Nevertheless, his analysis of capitalism’s often violent origins challenged many of the political economists of his time who imagined the world around them to be a kind of benign, Lockean “state of nature”. More recently, partly due to David Harvey’s (2003) reinterpretation of primitive accumulation as “accumulation by dispossession”, the term has found new significance (Glassman 2006). The novelty of Harvey’s argument has been to use the concept not only in relation to the shift from pre-capitalist to capitalist societies, but to also describe processes occurring today in the world’s advanced capitalist states, where capitalism has supposedly shifted beyond the primitive accumulation stage. Harvey teaches us that primitive accumulation is not a historic relic but an intrinsic part of capitalist development. But the increasing integration of capitalism on a global scale (see Cammack, this volume, Chapter 2) raises interesting questions regarding the form primitive accumulation assumes in peripheral settings on the frontiers of capitalist expansion (a significant theme of this volume).
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes http://www.academia.edu/10726031/State-Building_and_Primitive_Accumulation_in_Solomon_Islands_The_Unintended_Consequences_of_Risk_Mitigation_at_the_Frontiers_of_Global_Capitalist_Expansion

 
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Created: Thu, 25 Feb 2016, 10:44:04 EST by Bronwyn Clare Crook on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies