Maize yield determination in the Northern Region: hybrid by environment by management interactions

Ferrante, Ariel, Eyre, Joe, George-Jaeggli, Barbara, McLean, James, Chenu, Karine, deVoil, Peter, McLean, Greg and Rodriguez, Daniel (2015). Maize yield determination in the Northern Region: hybrid by environment by management interactions. In: Building Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes: Proceedings of the Australian Society of Agronomy Inc.’s 17th Australian Agronomy Conference. Australian Agronomy Conference, Hobart, TAS, Australia, (). 21-24 September 2015.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Ferrante, Ariel
Eyre, Joe
George-Jaeggli, Barbara
McLean, James
Chenu, Karine
deVoil, Peter
McLean, Greg
Rodriguez, Daniel
Title of paper Maize yield determination in the Northern Region: hybrid by environment by management interactions
Conference name Australian Agronomy Conference
Conference location Hobart, TAS, Australia
Conference dates 21-24 September 2015
Proceedings title Building Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes: Proceedings of the Australian Society of Agronomy Inc.’s 17th Australian Agronomy Conference
Place of Publication Warragul, VIC, Australia
Publisher Australian Society of Agronomy
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Total pages 4
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
In Maize, as with most cereals, grain yield is mostly determined by the total grain number per unit area, which is highly related to the rate of crop growth during the critical period around silking. Management practices such as plant density or nitrogen fertilization can affect the growth of the crop during this period, and consequently the final grain yield. Across the Northern Region maize is grown under a large range of plant populations under high year-to-year rainfall variability. Clear guidelines on how to match hybrids and management across environments and expected seasonal condition, would allow growers to increase yields and profits while managing risks. The objective of this research was to screen the response of commercial maize hybrids differing in maturity and prolificity (i.e. multi or single cobbing) types for their efficiency in the allocation of biomass into grain.

A field experiment was carried out at Gatton Research Station, Queensland where four different hybrids were grown at a range of plant populations and levels of environmental productivity.

Results show that prolific hybrids (i.e. multi cobbing) had similar or higher yields than non-prolific hybrids as consequence of a higher number of fertile tillers per plant. The role of fertile and infertile tillers in rainfed maize cropping is discussed.
Keyword Zea mays L
Tillering
Water
Nitrogen
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://www.agronomy2015.com.au/

 
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Created: Tue, 23 Feb 2016, 16:17:01 EST by Dr Karine Chenu on behalf of Centre for Plant Science