Predicting heading date and frost impact in wheat across Australia

Zheng, Bangyou, Chapman, Scott, Christopher, Jack, Frederiks, Troy and Chenu, Karine (2015). Predicting heading date and frost impact in wheat across Australia. In: Tina Botwright Acuña, Matthew Harrison, Carina Moelle and David Parsons, Building Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes: Proceedings of 17th Agronomy Conference 2015. 17th Australian Agronomy Conference, Hobart, Australia, (422-429). 20-24 September 2015.

Author Zheng, Bangyou
Chapman, Scott
Christopher, Jack
Frederiks, Troy
Chenu, Karine
Title of paper Predicting heading date and frost impact in wheat across Australia
Conference name 17th Australian Agronomy Conference
Conference location Hobart, Australia
Conference dates 20-24 September 2015
Convener Meinke, Holger
Proceedings title Building Productive, Diverse and Sustainable Landscapes: Proceedings of 17th Agronomy Conference 2015
Place of Publication Warragul, VIC Australia
Publisher Australian Society of Agronomy
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9780646952246
Editor Tina Botwright Acuña
Matthew Harrison
Carina Moelle
David Parsons
Start page 422
End page 429
Total pages 8
Chapter number 100
Total chapters 248
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Spring radiant frosts occurring when wheat is in reproductive developmental stages can result in catastrophic yield lost for producers. In wheat, heading time is the main determinant to minimize frost risks and to adapt new frost-tolerant cultivars to target population environments. Gene-based phenology models provide robust tools to predict heading times based on alleles of VRN and PPD genes, and have been widely validated across Australian wheatbelt for most of commercial wheat cultivars. A field experiment was conducted at Gatton in 2014 to calibrate the gene-based model for newly released cultivars. The results indicated that one field experiment including extended photoperiod and pre-vernalization treatments can be used to parameterize new cultivars and allow accurate prediction of heading time across all Australian environments using our gene-based model. Across Australia, we found that yield could be improved by up to 20% on average if frost tolerant lines were available. The yield increase resulted from (1) reduced frost damage and (2) the ability to use earlier sowing dates. Simulations suggest that a small reduction in the threshold temperatures, equivalent to frost tolerance of 1°C lower than current cultivars, would have a large effect in the west of Australia. In the east, frost tolerance to lower temperatures (~−4°C) would be required to maximise the yield advantage.
Keyword Post head-emergence frost
Reproductive frost
Spring radiant frost
Climate change
Crop modelling
APSIM
Crop adaptation
Breeding
Flowering
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 23 Feb 2016, 16:12:47 EST by Dr Karine Chenu on behalf of Centre for Plant Science