Parental pre-pregnance BMI is a dominant early-life risk factor influencing BMI of offspring in adulthood

Rath, S. R., Marsh, J. A., Newnham, J. P., Zhu, K., Atkinson, H. C., Mountain, J., Oddy, W. H., Hughes, I. P., Harris, M., Leong, G. M., Cotterill, A. M., Sly, P. D., Pennell, C. E. and Choong, C. S. (2016) Parental pre-pregnance BMI is a dominant early-life risk factor influencing BMI of offspring in adulthood. Obesity Science and Practice, 2 1: 48-57. doi:10.1002/osp4.28


Author Rath, S. R.
Marsh, J. A.
Newnham, J. P.
Zhu, K.
Atkinson, H. C.
Mountain, J.
Oddy, W. H.
Hughes, I. P.
Harris, M.
Leong, G. M.
Cotterill, A. M.
Sly, P. D.
Pennell, C. E.
Choong, C. S.
Title Parental pre-pregnance BMI is a dominant early-life risk factor influencing BMI of offspring in adulthood
Journal name Obesity Science and Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2055-2238
Publication date 2016-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/osp4.28
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Issue 1
Start page 48
End page 57
Total pages 10
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
We examined parental and early-life variables in order to identify risk factors for adulthood overweight and obesity in offspring. We report here on the longitudinal prevalence of overweight and obesity in Australian children born between 1989 and 1991 and followed from birth to age 22.

Methods

Data were analysed on 1355 participants from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, with anthropometry collected during pregnancy, at birth, one year and at three yearly intervals thereafter. Multivariate analyses and cross-sectional logistic regression quantified the timing and contribution of early-life risk factors for overweight and obesity in young-adulthood.

Results
At five years of age 12.6% of children were overweight and 5.2% were obese. By early adulthood, the prevalence of obesity had increased to 12.8%, whilst overweight remained relatively stable at 14.2% (range from early childhood to adulthood 11–16%). Parental pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was the strongest determinant of adult offspring BMI. Although rapid first year weight gain was associated with increased offspring BMI, the impact of first year weight-gain diminished over childhood, whilst the impact of parental BMI increased over time.

Conclusions

Parental pre-pregnancy BMI and rapid early-life weight gain predispose offspring to obesity in adulthood.
Keyword BMI
Early-life
Raine cohort
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 22 Feb 2016, 09:08:05 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience