A pilot study of traditional indoor biomass cooking and heating in rural Bhutan: gas and particle concentrations and emission rates

Wangchuk, Tenzin, He, Congrong, Knibbs, Luke D., Mazaheri, Mandana and Morawska, Lidia (2016) A pilot study of traditional indoor biomass cooking and heating in rural Bhutan: gas and particle concentrations and emission rates. Indoor Air, . doi:10.1111/ina.12291

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Author Wangchuk, Tenzin
He, Congrong
Knibbs, Luke D.
Mazaheri, Mandana
Morawska, Lidia
Title A pilot study of traditional indoor biomass cooking and heating in rural Bhutan: gas and particle concentrations and emission rates
Journal name Indoor Air   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0905-6947
1600-0668
Publication date 2016-02-16
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ina.12291
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Although many studies have reported the health effects of biomass fuels in developing countries, relatively few have quantitatively characterized emissions from biomass stoves during cooking and heating. The aim of this pilot study was to characterize the emission characteristics of different biomass stoves in four rural houses in Bhutan during heating (metal chimney stove), rice cooking (traditional mud stove), fodder preparation (stone tripod stove) and liquor distillation (traditional mud stove). Three stage measurements (before, during and after the activity had ceased) were conducted for PM2.5, particle number (PN), CO and CO2. When stoves were operated, the pollutant concentrations were significantly elevated above background levels, by an average of 40 and 18 times for PM2.5 and CO, respectively. Emission rates (mg/min) ranged from 1.07×102 (PM2.5) and 3.50×102 (CO) for the stone tripod stove during fodder preparation to 6.20×102 (PM2.5) and 2.22×103 (CO) for the traditional mud stove during liquor distillation. Usable PN data was only available for one house, during heating using a metal chimney stove, which presented an emission rate of 3.24×1013 particles/min. Interventions to control household air pollution in Bhutan, in order to reduce the health risks associated with cooking and heating are recommended.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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Created: Fri, 19 Feb 2016, 09:16:51 EST by Luke Knibbs on behalf of School of Public Health