Latitudinal variations in submarine channel sedimentation patterns: the role of coriolis forces

Cossu, R., Wells, M. G. and Peakall, J. (2015) Latitudinal variations in submarine channel sedimentation patterns: the role of coriolis forces. Journal of the Geological Society, 172 2: 161-174. doi:10.1144/jgs2014-043


Author Cossu, R.
Wells, M. G.
Peakall, J.
Title Latitudinal variations in submarine channel sedimentation patterns: the role of coriolis forces
Journal name Journal of the Geological Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0016-7649
2041-479X
Publication date 2015-03-15
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1144/jgs2014-043
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 172
Issue 2
Start page 161
End page 174
Total pages 14
Place of publication Bath, Avon United Kingdom
Publisher Geological Society of London
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Turbidity currents transport clastic sediments from the continental margin to deep ocean basins and along their pathways they erode large submarine channels. The driving mechanisms for submarine channel evolution are highly complex, reflected by recent debates about the formation and global distribution of sinuosity in turbidite channels. We present novel experiments on channelized gravity currents running over an erodible bed, where the magnitude of Coriolis forces is changed to reproduce conditions at low and high latitudes. We find a striking systematic change in deposition and erosion patterns as Coriolis forces become dominant at high latitudes so that erosion and deposition occur only on opposite sides of channels; in contrast, at low latitudes significant inner-bank intra-channel bars form on alternate sides of sinuous channels. Our observations show very good agreement with sedimentation patterns in Coriolis-dominated contourite drift systems and with deposits in modern and ancient turbidity current channels. We hypothesize that Coriolis forces are a key parameter for submarine channel evolution and sedimentary architecture at high latitudes but not at low latitudes; this proposal offers a new approach to interpret deep-sea architectural features at high latitudes.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Non HERDC
 
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Created: Thu, 18 Feb 2016, 21:07:28 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering