Evaluation of physiological control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices: an in-vitro study

Pauls, Jo P., Stevens, Michael C., Bartnikowski, Nicole, Fraser, John F., Gregory, Shaun D. and Tansley, Geoff (2016) Evaluation of physiological control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices: an in-vitro study. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 44 8: 2377-2387. doi:10.1007/s10439-016-1552-3


Author Pauls, Jo P.
Stevens, Michael C.
Bartnikowski, Nicole
Fraser, John F.
Gregory, Shaun D.
Tansley, Geoff
Title Evaluation of physiological control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices: an in-vitro study
Formatted title
Evaluation of physiological control systems for rotary left ventricular assist devices: an in-vitro study
Journal name Annals of Biomedical Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1573-9686
0090-6964
Publication date 2016-08
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10439-016-1552-3
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 44
Issue 8
Start page 2377
End page 2387
Total pages 11
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Rotary left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) show weaker response to preload and greater response to afterload than the native heart. This may lead to ventricular suction or pulmonary congestion, which can be deleterious to the patient’s recovery. A physiological control system which optimizes responsiveness of LVADs may reduce adverse events. This study compared eight physiological control systems for LVAD support against constant speed mode. Pulmonary (PVR) and systemic (SVR) vascular resistance changes, a passive postural change and exercise were simulated in a mock circulation loop to evaluate the controller’s ability to prevent suction and congestion and to increase exercise capacity. Three active and one passive control systems prevented ventricular suction at high PVR (500 dyne s cm−5) and low SVR (600 dyne s cm−5) by decreasing LVAD speed (by 200–515 rpm) and by increasing LVAD inflow cannula resistance (up to 1000 dyne s cm−5) respectively. These controllers increased LVAD preload sensitivity (to 0.196–2.415 L min−1 mmHg−1) compared to the other control systems and constant speed mode (0.039–0.069 L min−1 mmHg−1). The same three active controllers increased pump speed (600–800 rpm) and thus LVAD flow by 4.5 L min−1 during exercise which increased exercise capacity. Physiological control systems that prevent adverse events and/or increase exercise capacity may help improve LVAD patient conditions.
Keyword Active control
Left ventricular assist devices
Passive control
Physiological control
Ventricular suction prevention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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