Mitigating the risk to primitive accumulation: state-building and the logging boom in Solomon Islands

Hameiri, Shahar (2012) Mitigating the risk to primitive accumulation: state-building and the logging boom in Solomon Islands. Journal of Contemporary Asia, 42 3: 405-426. doi:10.1080/00472336.2012.687629


Author Hameiri, Shahar
Title Mitigating the risk to primitive accumulation: state-building and the logging boom in Solomon Islands
Journal name Journal of Contemporary Asia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0047-2336
1752-7554
Publication date 2012-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00472336.2012.687629
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 42
Issue 3
Start page 405
End page 426
Total pages 22
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract In recent years, various forms of inter/transnational state-building have become increasingly common as a way of managing the perceived risk posed by dysfunctional governance in so-called fragile states to Western security. In Solomon Islands, the Australian government has led a robust and expansive regional intervention, designed to build the capacity of the Solomon Islands government and bureaucracy to provide more effective governance. Dominant approaches to state-building link state failure with a failure of development and typically involve considerable efforts to promote economic development through the establishing of institutional structures seen to be supportive of liberal markets. Though economic activity has expanded considerably in Solomon Islands following the initial 2003 intervention, much of this has occurred in the unsustainable logging industry, whose expansion is reliant upon primitive accumulation. Therefore, to the extent that the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands' (RAMSI) state-building programmes have supported market-led growth, they have unwittingly acted to mitigate the risk to primitive accumulation. However, the logging boom occurring on RAMSI's watch is likely to lead to future social and political instability, either as a result of resource-depletion or due to bottom-up forms of social conflict around the destruction of local habitats.
Keyword State-building
Primitive accumulation
Liberal markets
Logging
RAMSI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 15 Feb 2016, 11:49:09 EST by Bronwyn Clare Crook on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies