Historical photographs revisited: a case study for dating and characterizing recent loss of coral cover on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

Clark, Tara R., Leonard, Nicole D., Zhao, Jian-xin, Brodie, Jon, McCook, Laurence J., Wachenfeld, David R., Nguyen, Ai Duc, Markham, Hannah L. and Pandolfi, John M. (2016) Historical photographs revisited: a case study for dating and characterizing recent loss of coral cover on the inshore Great Barrier Reef. Scientific Reports, 6 19285.1-19285.14. doi:10.1038/srep19285


Author Clark, Tara R.
Leonard, Nicole D.
Zhao, Jian-xin
Brodie, Jon
McCook, Laurence J.
Wachenfeld, David R.
Nguyen, Ai Duc
Markham, Hannah L.
Pandolfi, John M.
Title Historical photographs revisited: a case study for dating and characterizing recent loss of coral cover on the inshore Great Barrier Reef
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2016-01-27
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep19285
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Start page 19285.1
End page 19285.14
Total pages 14
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Subject 1000 General
Abstract Long-term data with high-precision chronology are essential to elucidate past ecological changes on coral reefs beyond the period of modern-day monitoring programs. In 2012 we revisited two inshore reefs within the central Great Barrier Reef, where a series of historical photographs document a loss of hard coral cover between c.1890-1994 AD. Here we use an integrated approach that includes high-precision U-Th dating specifically tailored for determining the age of extremely young corals to provide a robust, objective characterisation of ecological transition. The timing of mortality for most of the dead in situ corals sampled from the historical photograph locations was found to coincide with major flood events in 1990-1991 at Bramston Reef and 1970 and 2008 at Stone Island. Evidence of some recovery was found at Bramston Reef with living coral genera similar to what was described in c.1890 present in 2012. In contrast, very little sign of coral re-establishment was found at Stone Island suggesting delayed recovery. These results provide a valuable reference point for managers to continue monitoring the recovery (or lack thereof) of coral communities at these reefs.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
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