Trajectories of development of receptive vocabulary in individuals with Down syndrome

Cuskelly, Monica, Povey, Jenny and Jobling, Anne (2016) Trajectories of development of receptive vocabulary in individuals with Down syndrome. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 13 2: 111-119. doi:10.1111/jppi.12151


Author Cuskelly, Monica
Povey, Jenny
Jobling, Anne
Title Trajectories of development of receptive vocabulary in individuals with Down syndrome
Journal name Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1741-1130
1741-1122
Publication date 2016-04-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jppi.12151
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 111
End page 119
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Receptive vocabulary is an important aspect of cognitive functioning. It appears to be a relative strength with respect to language for individuals with Down syndrome (DS) but little is known about its development as individuals mature. This study was designed to establish the developmental trajectory of receptive language development in individuals with DS from early childhood to midadulthood. Two hundred and six individuals with DS provided Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) scores on 957 occasions, spanning ages from 2 years 7 months to 29 years 7 months. Latent growth curve models were used to establish the trajectory of receptive vocabulary. Gender, maternal education, cohort, and nonverbal intellectual ability were used as predictors of rate of development. Receptive vocabulary was found to increase until around 20 years of age when performance on the PPVT began to deteriorate. The only variable measured that was associated with PPVT performance was nonverbal ability. The rate of increase in receptive vocabulary in individuals with DS across the childhood and adolescent period appears to be slower than for those who are developing typically, and the expected influence of maternal education was not found. The small number of participants contributing data in the older ages included in this study means that the apparent decline in receptive vocabulary scores needs to be interpreted cautiously.
Keyword Down syndrome
Intellectual disability
Language
Longitudinal
Vocabulary
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes published online 21 April 2016. early view

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 08 Feb 2016, 09:47:13 EST by Jenny Povey on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research