Antiseptic body washes for reducing the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A cluster crossover study

Harris, Patrick N. A., Le, Bich Diep, Tambyah, Paul, Hsu, Li Yang, Pada, Surinder, Archuleta, Sophia, Salmon, Sharon, Mukhopadhyay, Amartya, Dillon, Jasmine, Ware, Robert and Fisher, Dale A. (2015) Antiseptic body washes for reducing the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A cluster crossover study. Open Forum Infectious Diseases, 2 2: . doi:10.1093/ofid/ofv051


Author Harris, Patrick N. A.
Le, Bich Diep
Tambyah, Paul
Hsu, Li Yang
Pada, Surinder
Archuleta, Sophia
Salmon, Sharon
Mukhopadhyay, Amartya
Dillon, Jasmine
Ware, Robert
Fisher, Dale A.
Title Antiseptic body washes for reducing the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A cluster crossover study
Formatted title
Antiseptic body washes for reducing the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A cluster crossover study
Journal name Open Forum Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2328-8957
Publication date 2015-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ofid/ofv051
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Issue 2
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background. Limiting the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) within healthcare facilities where the organism is highly endemic is a challenge. The use of topical antiseptic agents may help interrupt the transmission of MRSA and reduce the risk of clinical infection. Octenidine dihydrochloride is a topical antiseptic that exhibits in vitro efficacy against a wide variety of bacteria, including S aureus.

Methods. We conducted a prospective cluster crossover study to compare the use of daily octenidine body washes with soap and water in patients identified by active surveillance cultures to be MRSA-colonized, to prevent the acquisition of MRSA in patients with negative screening swabs. Five adult medical and surgical wards and 2 intensive care units were selected. The study involved an initial 6-month phase using octenidine or soap washes followed by a crossover in each ward to the alternative product. The primary and secondary outcomes were the rates of new MRSA acquisitions and MRSA clinical infections, respectively.

Results. A total of 10 936 patients admitted for ≥48 hours was included in the analysis. There was a small reduction in MRSA acquisition in the intervention group compared with controls (3.0% vs 3.3%), but this reduction was not significant (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, .72–1.11; P = .31). There were also no significant differences in clinical MRSA infection or incidence of MRSA bacteremia.

Conclusions. This study suggests that the targeted use of routine antiseptic washes may not in itself be adequate to reduce the transmission of MRSA in an endemic hospital setting.
Keyword Colonization
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Mrsa
Octenidine
Topical antiseptics
Intensive-Care-Unit
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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