Evolutionary aspects of physiological function and molecular diversity of the oxytocin/vasopressin signaling system

Liutkeviciute, Zita and Gruber, Christian W. (2016). Evolutionary aspects of physiological function and molecular diversity of the oxytocin/vasopressin signaling system. In Molecular neuroendocrinology: from genome to physiology (pp. 5-23) Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781118760369.ch1


Author Liutkeviciute, Zita
Gruber, Christian W.
Title of chapter Evolutionary aspects of physiological function and molecular diversity of the oxytocin/vasopressin signaling system
Title of book Molecular neuroendocrinology: from genome to physiology
Place of Publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1002/9781118760369.ch1
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9781118760376
Chapter number 1
Start page 5
End page 23
Total pages 19
Total chapters 19
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Neuropeptides and regulatory peptide hormones control important developmental, physiological, and behavioral processes in animals. One of the best studied peptidergic systems is oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) signaling. In humans and other mammalian species, OXT and AVP mediate a range of peripheral and central physiological functions that are important for osmoregulation, reproduction, complex social behaviors, memory, and learning. The origin of the OXT/AVP system is thought to date back more than 600 million years. All vertebrate OXT- and AVP-like peptides presumably have evolved from the ancestral nonapeptide vasotocin by gene duplication. These nonapeptides and their receptors are found in mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. OXT- and AVP-like peptides have also been identified in several invertebrate species, including mollusks, annelids, nematodes, and arthropods. Members of this peptide family share high sequence similarity and are functionally related across the entire animal kingdom. Whereas the physiology of OXT and AVP signaling components has been studied in detail in vertebrates and mammals, there is little known about the diversity and function in invertebrates. It is evident that not all invertebrates express OXT- or AVP-like neuropeptides and their receptors. Hence it is of great interest to identify novel invertebrate OXT-like signaling systems and to elucidate their physiological function. The discovery and characterization of these novel peptide hormones will provide opportunities for pharmacology and drug design, and importantly this information may be useful for comparative studies to identify common features of OXT and AVP physiology throughout the animal kingdom that may yield translational insights into evolutionary aspects of human behavior.
Keyword Cyclotides
Evolution
Genome
Genome mining
G protein-coupled receptors
Oxytocin
Peptide signaling
Vasopressin
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

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Created: Thu, 04 Feb 2016, 19:55:11 EST by Christian Gruber on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences