Patient satisfaction with health care providers in South Africa: the influences of race and socioeconomic status

Myburgh, Neil G., Solanki, Geetesh C., Smith, Matthew J. and Lalloo, Ratilal (2005) Patient satisfaction with health care providers in South Africa: the influences of race and socioeconomic status. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 17 6: 473-477. doi:10.1093/intqhc/mzi062


Author Myburgh, Neil G.
Solanki, Geetesh C.
Smith, Matthew J.
Lalloo, Ratilal
Title Patient satisfaction with health care providers in South Africa: the influences of race and socioeconomic status
Journal name International Journal for Quality in Health Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1353-4505
1464-3677
Publication date 2005-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/intqhc/mzi062
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 17
Issue 6
Start page 473
End page 477
Total pages 5
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: The first democratic government elected in South Africa in 1994 inherited huge inequalities in health status and health provision across all sections of the population. This study set out to assess, 4 years later, the influence of race and socioeconomic status (SES) on perceived quality of care from health care providers.

Design: A 1998 countrywide survey of 3820 households assessed many aspects of health care delivery, including levels of satisfaction with health care providers among different segments of South African society.

Results: Fifty-one percent (n = 1953) of the respondents had attended a primary care facility in the year preceding the interview and were retained in the analysis. Both race and SES were significant predictors of levels of satisfaction with the services of the health care provider, after adjusting for gender, age, and type of facility visited. White and high SES respondents were about 1.5 times more likely to report excellent service compared with Black and low SES respondents, respectively.

Conclusion: In South Africa, race and SES are not synonymous and can no longer be considered reliable proxy indicators of one another. Each has distinct and significant but different degrees of association with client satisfaction. Any assessment of equity-driven health policy in South Africa should consider the impacts of both race and SES on client satisfaction as one of the indicators of success.
Keyword Equality
Health care provider
Health policy
Patient satisfaction
Race
Socioeconomic status
South Africa
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Dentistry Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 04 Feb 2016, 12:02:26 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)