Holocene fluvial-coastal interactions on a mixed sand and sand and gravel beach system, North Canterbury, New Zealand

Shulmeister, J and Kirk, RM (1997) Holocene fluvial-coastal interactions on a mixed sand and sand and gravel beach system, North Canterbury, New Zealand. Catena, 30 4: 337-355. doi:10.1016/S0341-8162(97)00013-1


Author Shulmeister, J
Kirk, RM
Title Holocene fluvial-coastal interactions on a mixed sand and sand and gravel beach system, North Canterbury, New Zealand
Journal name Catena   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0341-8162
1872-6887
Publication date 1997-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0341-8162(97)00013-1
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 337
End page 355
Total pages 19
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Fluvio-coastal interactions are examined on a progradational sand, and mixed sand and gravel beach sequence between the Ashley and Kowai rivers, Pegasus Bay, New Zealand. This coastal system presents an example of a wave-dominated environment energetic enough to deal with the sediment supply derived from the rivers, but where the coast is still prograding. Progradation occurs because of the inability of the marine system to evacuate wave-eroded sediment from the bay floor. This results in gradual nearshore aggradation until nearshore storage is filled and sediment is finally transported landward to form a new beach ridge. This type of coastal system can be identified by a diagnostic morphological assemblage comprising a ‘small river’ coastal morphology (sensu Zenkovich (1967, Processes of Coastal Development, Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh) backed by a sequence of beach ridges. Sediment fractionation (shape and size sorting) is identified as the primary effect of erosional processes on a mixed sand and gravel beach. Fractionation is capable of converting sandy beaches with minor gravel components to graveldominated beaches. Gravel is concentrated by the evacuation of sand from the shoreface. This occurs dominantly through storm sifting but also occurs in response to normal swash processes. This process is very similar to the process of chenier production on mixed mud and sand beaches, and fractionation is highlighted as a dominant erosional process on mixed beaches, irrespective of grain size.
Keyword Erosional processes
Flurio-coastal interactions
Mixed beaches
Progradiational sand
Sediment fractionation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
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