The impact of advance care planning on end of life care in elderly patients: randomised controlled trial

Detering, Karen M., Hancock, Andrew D., Reade, Michael C. and Silvester, William (2010) The impact of advance care planning on end of life care in elderly patients: randomised controlled trial. BMJ (Online), 340 . doi:10.1136/bmj.c1345


Author Detering, Karen M.
Hancock, Andrew D.
Reade, Michael C.
Silvester, William
Title The impact of advance care planning on end of life care in elderly patients: randomised controlled trial
Journal name BMJ (Online)
ISSN 1756-1833
0959-535X
Publication date 2010-04-17
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.c1345
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 340
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To investigate the impact of advance care planning on end of life care in elderly patients.

Design: Prospective randomised controlled trial.

Setting: Single centre study in a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia.

Participants: 309 legally competent medical inpatients aged 80 or more and followed for six months or until death.

Interventions: Participants were randomised to receive usual care or usual care plus facilitated advance care planning. Advance care planning aimed to assist patients to reflect on their goals, values, and beliefs; to consider future medical treatment preferences; to appoint a surrogate; and to document their wishes.

Main outcome measures: The primary outcome was whether a patient's end of life wishes were known and respected. Other outcomes included patient and family satisfaction with hospital stay and levels of stress, anxiety, and depression in relatives of patients who died.

Results: 154 of the 309 patients were randomised to advance care planning, 125 (81%) received advance care planning, and 108 (84%) expressed wishes or appointed a surrogate, or both. Of the 56 patients who died by six months, end of life wishes were much more likely to be known and followed in the intervention group (25/29, 86%) compared with the control group (8/27, 30%; P<0.001). In the intervention group, family members of patients who died had significantly less stress (intervention 5, control 15; P<0.001), anxiety (intervention 0, control 3; P=0.02), and depression (intervention 0, control 5; P=0.002) than those of the control patients. Patient and family satisfaction was higher in the intervention group.

Conclusions: Advance care planning improves end of life care and patient and family satisfaction and reduces stress, anxiety, and depression in surviving relatives.

Trial registration: Australian New Zealand clinical trials registry ACTRN12608000539336.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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