Early life rhinovirus infection exacerbates house-dust-mite induced lung disease more severely in female mice

Phan, Jennifer A., Kicic, Anthony, Berry, Luke J., Sly, Peter D. and Larcombe, Alexander N. (2016) Early life rhinovirus infection exacerbates house-dust-mite induced lung disease more severely in female mice. Experimental Lung Research, 42 1: 24-36. doi:10.3109/01902148.2015.1131346


Author Phan, Jennifer A.
Kicic, Anthony
Berry, Luke J.
Sly, Peter D.
Larcombe, Alexander N.
Title Early life rhinovirus infection exacerbates house-dust-mite induced lung disease more severely in female mice
Journal name Experimental Lung Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1521-0499
0190-2148
Publication date 2016-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/01902148.2015.1131346
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 42
Issue 1
Start page 24
End page 36
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Recent studies have employed animal models to investigate links between rhinovirus infection and allergic airways disease, however, most do not involve early life infection, and none consider the effects of sex on responses. Materials and Methods: Here, we infected male and female mice with human rhinovirus 1B (or control) on day 7 of life. Mice were then subjected to 7 weeks of exposure to house-dust-mite prior to assessment of bronchoalveolar inflammation, serum antibodies, lung function, and responsiveness to methacholine. Results: There were significant differences in responses between males and females in most outcomes. In males, chronic house-dust-mite exposure increased bronchoalveolar inflammation, house-dust-mite specific IgG1 and responsiveness of the lung parenchyma, however, there was no additional impact of rhinovirus infection. Conversely, in females, there were additive and synergistic effects of rhinovirus infection and house-dust-mite exposure on neutrophilia, airway resistance, and responsiveness of the lung parenchyma. Conclusions: We conclude that early life rhinovirus infection influences the development of house-dust-mite induced lung disease in female, but not male mice.
Keyword House-dust-mite
Lung function
Neonatal BALB/c mice
Rhinovirus
Sex differences
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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