Current state of colorectal surgery training: a survey of program directors, current and recently matched colorectal residents, and recent colorectal graduates

Bailey, Matthew B., Miller, Peter E., Pawlak, Stephanie E., Thomas, Michael S., Beck, David E., Vargas, H. David, Whitlow, Charles B. and Margolin, David A. (2016) Current state of colorectal surgery training: a survey of program directors, current and recently matched colorectal residents, and recent colorectal graduates. Surgical Endoscopy, 59 2: 140-147. doi:10.1097/DCR.0000000000000525


Author Bailey, Matthew B.
Miller, Peter E.
Pawlak, Stephanie E.
Thomas, Michael S.
Beck, David E.
Vargas, H. David
Whitlow, Charles B.
Margolin, David A.
Title Current state of colorectal surgery training: a survey of program directors, current and recently matched colorectal residents, and recent colorectal graduates
Journal name Surgical Endoscopy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1530-0358
0930-2794
Publication date 2016-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/DCR.0000000000000525
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 59
Issue 2
Start page 140
End page 147
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Colorectal residency has become one of the more competitive postgraduate training opportunities; however, little information is available to guide potential applicants in gauging their competitiveness.

Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the current trends colorectal residency training and to identify what factors are considered most important in ranking a candidate highly. We hypothesized that there was a difference in what program directors, current and recently matched colorectal residents, and recent graduates consider most important in making a candidate competitive for a colorectal residency position.

Design: Three 10-question anonymous surveys were sent to 59 program directors, 87 current and recently matched colorectal residents, and 119 recent graduates in March 2015.

Settings: The study was conducted as an anonymous internet survey.

Main outcome measures: Current trends in applying for a colorectal residency, competitiveness of recent colorectal residents, factors considered most important in ranking a candidate highly, and what future colorectal surgeons can expect after finishing their training were measured.

Results: The study had an overall response rate of 43%, with 28 (47%) of 59 program directors, 46 (53%) of 87 current and recently matched colorectal residents, and 39 (33%) of 119 recent graduates responding. The majority of program directors felt that a candidate's performance during the interview process was the most important factor in making a candidate competitive, followed by contact from a colleague, letters of recommendation, American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam scores, and number of publications/presentations. The majority of current and recently matched colorectal residents felt that a recommendation/telephone call from a colleague was the most important factor, whereas the majority of recent graduates favored letters of recommendation as the most important factor in ranking a candidate highly.

Limitations: Limitations to the study include its small sample size, selection bias, responder bias, and misclassification bias.

Conclusions: There are differences in what program directors and current/recent residents consider most important in making an applicant competitive for colorectal residency.
Keyword American Board of Surgery In-Training Exam
Colorectal residency
Education
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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