Rash impulsivity predicts lower anticipated pleasure response and a preference for the supernormal

Goodwin, Belinda C., Browne, Matthew, Rockloff, Matthew and Loxton, Natalie J. (2016) Rash impulsivity predicts lower anticipated pleasure response and a preference for the supernormal. Personality and Individual Differences, 94 206-210. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2016.01.030


Author Goodwin, Belinda C.
Browne, Matthew
Rockloff, Matthew
Loxton, Natalie J.
Title Rash impulsivity predicts lower anticipated pleasure response and a preference for the supernormal
Journal name Personality and Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2016-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2016.01.030
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 94
Start page 206
End page 210
Total pages 5
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Alcohol, other psychoactive substances, high calorie foods, media entertainment, gaming, and retail products are all forms of modern supernormal stimuli. They exhibit exaggerated features that activate evolved reward systems more so than the natural stimuli for which these systems are adapted. Recent findings suggest that people may vary in the strength of their preference toward supernormal stimuli. The current study assessed whether the two-factor model of impulsivity (Dawe & Loxton, 2004) predicts a preference for supernormal stimuli. A cross-sectional survey design (n = 5389) was used to measure anticipatory pleasure for both supernormal and natural-reward experiences; and their hypothesized antecedents: Rash impulsivity (RI) and reward drive (RD). As predicted, RI was positively associated with preference for supernormal stimuli and negatively associated with general anticipatory pleasure ratings. In contrast, RD was positively associated with general pleasure ratings, but explained little to no variance in supernormal preference when controlling for RI. The findings link trait rash impulsivity with increased sensitivity to supernormal stimuli, and provide new insights into both constructs.
Keyword Health behaviour
Impulsivity
Reward drive
Supernormal stimuli
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
 
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