Australia and other nations are failing to meet sedentary behavior guidelines for children: implications and a way forward

Straker, Leon, Howie, Erin Kaye, Cliff, Dylan Paul, Davern, Melanie T, Engelen, Lina, Gomersall, Sjaan R, Ziviani, Jenny, Schranz, Natasha K, Olds, Tim and Tomkinson, Grant Ryan (2015) Australia and other nations are failing to meet sedentary behavior guidelines for children: implications and a way forward. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 13 2: 177-188. doi:10.1123/jpah.2015-0026

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Author Straker, Leon
Howie, Erin Kaye
Cliff, Dylan Paul
Davern, Melanie T
Engelen, Lina
Gomersall, Sjaan R
Ziviani, Jenny
Schranz, Natasha K
Olds, Tim
Tomkinson, Grant Ryan
Title Australia and other nations are failing to meet sedentary behavior guidelines for children: implications and a way forward
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2015-02-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2015-0026
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 177
End page 188
Total pages 36
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:  Australia has joined a growing number of nations which have evaluated the physical activity and sedentary behaviour status of their children. Australia received a ‘D minus’ in the first Active Healthy Kids Australia Physical Activity Report Card.

Methods:  An expert subgroup of the Australian Report Card Research Working Group iteratively reviewed available evidence to answer three questions: 1) What are the main sedentary behaviours of children?, 2) What are the potential mechanisms for sedentary behaviour to impact on child health and development? and, 3) What are the effects of different types of sedentary behaviours on child health and development?

Results:  Neither sedentary time nor screen time are homogeneous activities likely to result in homogenous effects. There are several mechanisms by which various sedentary behaviours may positively or negatively affect cardiometabolic, neuro-musculoskeletal, and psycho-social health, though the strength of evidence varies. National surveillance systems, and mechanistic, longitudinal and experimental studies are needed for Australia and other nations to improve their grade.

Conclusions:  Despite limitations, available evidence is sufficiently convincing that the total exposure and pattern of exposure to sedentary behaviours are critical to the healthy growth, development and wellbeing of children. Nations therefore need strategies to address these common behaviours.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 29 Jan 2016, 14:47:56 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences