Barriers to market orientation in Australian vertically-integrated horticultural enterprises

Currey, P.R., Somogyi, S. and Ariyawardana, A. (2015). Barriers to market orientation in Australian vertically-integrated horticultural enterprises. In: P. P. Oppenheim, 29th Int Horticultural Congress on Horticulture - Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC) / 17th Int Symposium on Horticultural Econ and Management / 5th Int Symposium on Improving the Performance of Supply Chains in the Transit Economies, Brisbane, Australia, (109-114). 17-22 August 2014. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1103.16


Author Currey, P.R.
Somogyi, S.
Ariyawardana, A.
Title of paper Barriers to market orientation in Australian vertically-integrated horticultural enterprises
Conference name 29th Int Horticultural Congress on Horticulture - Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC) / 17th Int Symposium on Horticultural Econ and Management / 5th Int Symposium on Improving the Performance of Supply Chains in the Transit Economies
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 17-22 August 2014
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1103.16
ISBN 978-94-62610-91-0
ISSN 0567-7572
Editor P. P. Oppenheim
Volume 1103
Start page 109
End page 114
Total pages 6
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Market orientation contributes to organisational performance and employee morale. Given the scarcity of research in the Australian horticultural industry, this study was conducted to determine why vertically integrated horticultural enterprises establish the degree of market orientation that they do, and to identify the beliefs of founders and owners that prevent them from striving for and achieving higher levels. The study employed a qualitative approach involving four Australian vertically-integrated value-adding enterprises in south east Queensland and northern New South Wales. Two firms with annual incomes of $AUD 30-40m and two with less than $AUD 2m were selected as the case study firms. Senior managers from each organisation were interviewed three times resulting in a total of 52 semi-structured interviews. At the commencement of the final interview, interviewees received a short presentation about market orientation, the benefits of organisations being market oriented and evidence to support the relationship between market orientation and superior performance. Based on observations and data collected through interviews, all four organisations were less than fully market oriented. The results indicate that a limited understanding of contemporary marketing principles, a mistrust of marketing as an organisational discipline and resistance by founders and owners to allow others to make important management decisions were the principle reasons why higher levels of market orientation were not achieved.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 28 Jan 2016, 08:50:40 EST by Anoma Ariyawardana on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences