Coastal feasts: a Pleistocene antiquity for resource abundance in the maritime deserts of north west Australia?

Veth, Peter, Ward, Ingrid and Manne, Tiina (2016) Coastal feasts: a Pleistocene antiquity for resource abundance in the maritime deserts of north west Australia?. Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, 1-16. doi:10.1080/15564894.2015.1132799


Author Veth, Peter
Ward, Ingrid
Manne, Tiina
Title Coastal feasts: a Pleistocene antiquity for resource abundance in the maritime deserts of north west Australia?
Journal name Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-4894
1556-1828
Publication date 2016-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/15564894.2015.1132799
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Located on the edge of Australia's North West continental shelf, Barrow Island is uniquely located to address a number of research questions, such as the antiquity and changing nature of Indigenous occupation, including shifting uses of regional economic resources in response to post-glacial sea-level rise. These questions are addressed from a range of archaeological, zooarchaeological, and geoarchaeological disciplines. Although only preliminary, results to date indicate the presence of marine resources dating to before sea-level stabilization (∼ 7.5 ka) that contain both dietary and utilitarian species, including high-ranked species such as sea turtle. The marine assemblages reflect a variety of habitats and substrates with a 17,000-year record for the presence of a former tidal marsh or estuary. We also note recently obtained 14C and OSL dates that extend the dietary marine faunas and initial occupation to well before 41 ka. This demonstrates that consumption of coastal resources began prior to the Holocene, when we begin to observe more widespread evidence of marine resource exploitation in the broader Canarvon Bioregion of northwest Australia. This evidence supports arguments for further research to directly test both the productivity of, and human reliance on, marine habitats from initial occupation.
Keyword Drowned continental shelf
Last Glacial Maximum
Marine economy
Northern Australia
Pleistocene-Holocene Transition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 27 Jan 2016, 14:13:42 EST by Tiina Manne on behalf of School of Social Science