Low-intensity case management increases contact with primary care in recently released prisoners: a single-blinded, multisite, randomised controlled trial

Kinner, Stuart A., Alati, Rosa, Longo, Marie, Spittal, Matthew J., Boyle, Frances M., Williams, Gail M. and Lennox, Nicholas G. (2016) Low-intensity case management increases contact with primary care in recently released prisoners: a single-blinded, multisite, randomised controlled trial. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 70 7: 683-688. doi:10.1136/jech-2015-206565


Author Kinner, Stuart A.
Alati, Rosa
Longo, Marie
Spittal, Matthew J.
Boyle, Frances M.
Williams, Gail M.
Lennox, Nicholas G.
Title Low-intensity case management increases contact with primary care in recently released prisoners: a single-blinded, multisite, randomised controlled trial
Journal name Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0143-005X
1470-2738
Publication date 2016-01-19
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2015-206565
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 70
Issue 7
Start page 683
End page 688
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The world prison population is large and growing. Poor health outcomes after release from prison are common, but few programmes to improve health outcomes for ex-prisoners have been rigorously evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of individualised case management on contact with health services during the first 6 months post-release.

Methods: Single-blinded, randomised, controlled trial. Baseline assessment with N=1325 adult prisoners in Queensland, Australia, within 6 weeks of expected release; follow-up interviews 1, 3 and 6 months post-release. The intervention consisted of provision of a personalised booklet (‘Passport’) at the time of release, plus up to four brief telephone contacts in the first 4 weeks post-release.

Results: Of 1179 eligible participants, 1003 (85%) completed ≥1 follow-up interview. In intention-to-treat analyses, 53% of the intervention group and 41% of the control group reported contacting a general practitioner (GP) at 1 month post-release (difference=12%, 95% CI 5% to 19%). Similar effects were observed for GP contact at 3 months (difference=9%, 95% CI 2% to 16%) and 6 months (difference=8%, 95% CI 1% to 15%), and for mental health (MH) service contact at 6 months post release (difference=8%, 95% CI 3% to 14%).

Conclusions: Individualised case management in the month after release from prison increases usage of primary care and MH services in adult ex-prisoners for at least 6 months post-release. Given the poor health profile of ex-prisoners, there remains an urgent need to develop and rigorously evaluate interventions to increase health service contact in this profoundly marginalised population.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 22 Jan 2016, 14:13:08 EST by Dr Fran Boyle on behalf of School of Public Health