The Teneriffe woolstores : a study of their history and architecture

McLucas, Andrew (1989). The Teneriffe woolstores : a study of their history and architecture Master's Thesis, School of Geography, Planning and Architecture., The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE10802.pdf Full text application/pdf 17.15MB 0
Author McLucas, Andrew
Thesis Title The Teneriffe woolstores : a study of their history and architecture
School, Centre or Institute School of Geography, Planning and Architecture.
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1989-01-01
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Supervisor Bal Saini
Total pages 21
Language eng
Subjects 1201 Architecture
Formatted abstract
This thesis is a study of the history and architecture of the Teneriffe Woolstores. Its purpose is to provide an historical understanding of the development of the architecture, both individually and collectively of these buildings. Investigation is centred around the compilation of relevant historical information with particular attention to the issues of functionalism and local influences. The architecture was found to have evolved from a southern model, adapted to suit functional requirements together with local conditions and techniques. In the main, it is based on a wide range of published sources together with the memories of people associated with the architecture of the buildings and the wool industry. It includes sections on the history of Teneriffe, the wool industry, the development of architectural form and aesthetics, structural considerations and materials. In addition, major buildings are catalogued outlining key information together with an annotated list of sources consulted.
Keyword Architecture - Brisbane

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 20 Jan 2016, 22:16:03 EST by Ms Christine Heslehurst on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service