Different behavioral explanations of the Neolithic transition from foraging to agriculture: a review

Tisdell, Clem and Svizzero, Serge (2016). Different behavioral explanations of the Neolithic transition from foraging to agriculture: a review. Economic Theory, Applications and Issues Working Paper Series 75, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ377410_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 314.91KB 0
Author Tisdell, Clem
Svizzero, Serge
Title Different behavioral explanations of the Neolithic transition from foraging to agriculture: a review
School, Department or Centre School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Series Economic Theory, Applications and Issues Working Paper Series
Report Number 75
Publication date 2016-01-19
Publisher School of Economics, The University of Queensland
Total pages 36
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This article examines how well two parallel behavioral approaches, one in economics and the other in anthropology, explain the economic evolution of Neolithic societies, particularly their transit from foraging to agriculture. Both assume rational optimizing behavior. It is argued that satisficing theories provide a superior explanation of transition (and non-transition) by some hunter-gatherers. Furthermore, many of the concepts associated with neoclassical economics are shown to be inadequate for analyzing the choice problems involved. Moreover, it is argued that all behavioral theories considering the relationship between human behavior and economic evolution need to pay attention to the way that decision-making is embedded in social structures. It is unlikely that a single theory will be able to explain the economic evolution of all societies when social structures and other relevant variables differ between communities.
Keyword Economic evolution
Economic optimization
Human behavioral ecology
Hunter-gatherers
Neolithic Revolution
Satisficing behavior
Social embedding
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Working Paper
Collection: School of Economics Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 Jan 2016, 12:54:24 EST by Emeritus Professor Clement Tisdell on behalf of School of Economics