Introduction to the symposium: towards a general framework for predicting animal movement speeds in nature

Wilson, Robbie S. and Husak, Jerry F. (2015). Introduction to the symposium: towards a general framework for predicting animal movement speeds in nature. In: Towards a General Framework for Predicting Animal Movement Speeds in Nature, West Palm Beach, Florida, (1121-1124). 3-7 January 2015. doi:10.1093/icb/icv107


Author Wilson, Robbie S.
Husak, Jerry F.
Title of paper Introduction to the symposium: towards a general framework for predicting animal movement speeds in nature
Conference name Towards a General Framework for Predicting Animal Movement Speeds in Nature
Conference location West Palm Beach, Florida
Conference dates 3-7 January 2015
Convener Wilson, Robbie S.
Journal name Integrative and Comparative Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Publication Year 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1093/icb/icv107
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISSN 1557-7023
1540-7063
Volume 55
Issue 6
Start page 1121
End page 1124
Total pages 4
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Speed of movement is fundamental to animal behavior—defining the intensity of a task, the time needed to complete it, and the likelihood of success—but how does an animal decide how fast to move? Most studies of animal performance measure maximum capabilities, but animals rarely move at their maximum in the wild. It was the goal of our symposium to develop a conceptual framework to explore the choices of speed in nature. A major difference between our approach and previous work is our move toward understanding optimal rather than maximal speeds. In the following series of papers, we provide a starting point for future work on animal movement speeds, including a conceptual framework, a simple optimality model, an evolutionary context, and an exploration of the various biomechanical and energetic constraints on speed. By applying a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of the choice of speed—as we have done here—we can reveal much about the way animals use habitats, interact with conspecifics, avoid predators, obtain food, and negotiate human-modified landscapes.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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