Thoracic and lumbar posture behaviour in sitting tasks and standing: progressing the biomechanics from observations to measurements

Claus, Andrew P., Hides, Julie A., Moseley, G. Lorimer and Hodges, Paul W. (2016) Thoracic and lumbar posture behaviour in sitting tasks and standing: progressing the biomechanics from observations to measurements. Applied Ergonomics, 53 161-168. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2015.09.006


Author Claus, Andrew P.
Hides, Julie A.
Moseley, G. Lorimer
Hodges, Paul W.
Title Thoracic and lumbar posture behaviour in sitting tasks and standing: progressing the biomechanics from observations to measurements
Journal name Applied Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-9126
0003-6870
Publication date 2016-03
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.apergo.2015.09.006
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 53
Start page 161
End page 168
Total pages 9
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Few studies quantify spinal posture behaviour at both the thoracolumbar and lumbar spinal regions. This study compared spontaneous spinal posture in 50 asymptomatic participants (21 males) during three conditions: 10-min computer task in sitting (participants naïve to the measure), during their perceived ‘correct’ sitting posture, and standing. Three-dimensional optical tracking quantified surface spinal angles at the thoracolumbar and lumbar regions, and spinal orientation with respect to the vertical. Despite popular belief that lordotic lumbar angles are ‘correct’ for sitting, this was rarely adopted for 10-min sitting. In 10-min sitting, spinal angles flexed 24(7–9)deg at lumbar and 12(6–8)deg at thoracolumbar regions relative to standing (P < 0.001). When participants ‘corrected’ their sitting posture, their thoracolumbar angle −2(7)deg was similar to the angle in standing −1(6)deg (P = 1.00). Males were flexed at the lumbar angle relative to females for 10-min sitting, ‘correct’ sitting and standing, but showed no difference at the thoracolumbar region.
Keyword Posture
Sitting
Spine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 21 October 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
 
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