Molecular characterization of native Australian trypanosomes in quokka (Setonix brachyurus) populations from Western Australia

Austen, Jill M., Paparini, Andrea, Reid, Simon A., Friend, James A., Ditcham, William G. F. and Ryan, Una (2016) Molecular characterization of native Australian trypanosomes in quokka (Setonix brachyurus) populations from Western Australia. Parasitology International, 65 3: 205-208. doi:10.1016/j.parint.2015.12.005

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Austen, Jill M.
Paparini, Andrea
Reid, Simon A.
Friend, James A.
Ditcham, William G. F.
Ryan, Una
Title Molecular characterization of native Australian trypanosomes in quokka (Setonix brachyurus) populations from Western Australia
Formatted title
Molecular characterization of native Australian trypanosomes in quokka (Setonix brachyurus) populations from Western Australia
Journal name Parasitology International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-0329
1383-5769
Publication date 2016-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
DOI 10.1016/j.parint.2015.12.005
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 65
Issue 3
Start page 205
End page 208
Total pages 4
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The quokka, Setonix brachyurus, is a vulnerable, small marsupial endemic to Western Australia. Blood samples were collected from quokkas from three different geographical locations; Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island. The overall prevalence of trypanosomes by nested PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was 57.3% (63/110) with prevalences of 91.4%, 85.3% and 4.9% respectively for Two Peoples Bay, Bald Island and Rottnest Island. Phylogenetic analysis conducted on 47 18S PCR positives identified two Trypanosoma copemani genotypes, with T. copemani genotype B, the most prevalent genotype infecting quokka populations from the three locations with an overall prevalence of 51.8% (24/47) compared to 34% for T. copemani genotype A (16/47). The overall prevalence of mixed T. copemani genotype A and B infections was 14.9% (7/47). Phylogenetic analysis of 26 quokka isolates at the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) locus, largely supported the 18S analysis but identified a mixed infection in one quokka isolate (Q4112-4117 from Two Peoples Bay). T. copemani genotype B has previously only been isolated from quokkas and the Gilbert's potoroo whereas T. copemani genotype A has a wide host range and may be pathogenic. Further work is required to determine the clinical impact of T. copemani on marsupial populations.
Keyword 18S rRNA
Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)
Quokka
T. copemani
T. vegrandis
Trypanosome
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 15 December 2015

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Letter to editor, brief commentary or brief communication
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Jan 2016, 00:15:00 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)