Predators help protect carbon stocks in blue carbon ecosystems

Atwood, Trisha B., Connolly, Rod M., Ritchie, Euan G., Lovelock, Catherine E., Heithaus, Michael R., Hays, Graema C., Fourqurean, James W. and Macreadie, Peter I. (2015) Predators help protect carbon stocks in blue carbon ecosystems. Nature Climate Change, 5 12: 1038-1045. doi:10.1038/nclimate2763


Author Atwood, Trisha B.
Connolly, Rod M.
Ritchie, Euan G.
Lovelock, Catherine E.
Heithaus, Michael R.
Hays, Graema C.
Fourqurean, James W.
Macreadie, Peter I.
Title Predators help protect carbon stocks in blue carbon ecosystems
Journal name Nature Climate Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-6798
1758-678X
Publication date 2015-12-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1038/nclimate2763
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 5
Issue 12
Start page 1038
End page 1045
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Predators continue to be harvested unsustainably throughout most of the Earth's ecosystems. Recent research demonstrates that the functional loss of predators could have far-reaching consequences on carbon cycling and, by implication, our ability to ameliorate climate change impacts. Yet the influence of predators on carbon accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats (that is, salt marshes, seagrass meadows and mangroves) is poorly understood, despite these being some of the Earth's most vulnerable and carbon-rich ecosystems. Here we discuss potential pathways by which trophic downgrading affects carbon capture, accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats. We identify an urgent need for further research on the influence of predators on carbon cycling in vegetated coastal habitats, and ultimately the role that these systems play in climate change mitigation. There is, however, sufficient evidence to suggest that intact predator populations are critical to maintaining or growing reserves of 'blue carbon' (carbon stored in coastal or marine ecosystems), and policy and management need to be improved to reflect these realities.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 10 Jan 2016, 00:24:13 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service