Children's expectations and strategies in interacting with a Wizard of Oz Robot

Worthy, Peter, Boden, Marie, Karimi, Arafeh, Weigel, Jason, Matthews, Ben, Hensby, Kristyn, Heath, Scott, Pounds, Paul, Taufatofua, Jonathon, Smith, Michael, Viller, Stephen and Wiles, Janet (2015). Children's expectations and strategies in interacting with a Wizard of Oz Robot. In: Bernd Ploderer, Marcus Carter, Martin Gibbs, Wally Smith and Frank Vetere, Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Australian Special Interest Group for Computer Human Interaction. OZCHI '15, Melbourne, Australia, (608-612). 7-10 December 2015. doi:10.1145/2838739.2838793

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Author Worthy, Peter
Boden, Marie
Karimi, Arafeh
Weigel, Jason
Matthews, Ben
Hensby, Kristyn
Heath, Scott
Pounds, Paul
Taufatofua, Jonathon
Smith, Michael
Viller, Stephen
Wiles, Janet
Title of paper Children's expectations and strategies in interacting with a Wizard of Oz Robot
Conference name OZCHI '15
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 7-10 December 2015
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Australian Special Interest Group for Computer Human Interaction
Journal name OzCHI 2015: Being Human - Conference Proceedings
Place of Publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher ACM
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1145/2838739.2838793
ISBN 9781450336734
Editor Bernd Ploderer
Marcus Carter
Martin Gibbs
Wally Smith
Frank Vetere
Start page 608
End page 612
Total pages 5
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This paper presents an analysis of children’s interactions with an early prototype of a robot that is being designed for deployment in early learning centres. 23 children aged 2-6 interacted with the prototype, consisting of a pair of tablets embedded in a flat and vaguely humanoid form. We used a Wizard of Oz (WoZ) technique to control a synthesized voice that delivered predefined statements and questions, and a tablet mounted as a head that displayed animated eyes. The children’s interactions with the robot and with the adult experimenter were video recorded and analysed in order to identify some of the children’s expectations of the robot’s behaviour and capabilities, and to observe their strategies for interacting with a speaking and minimally animated artificial agent. We found a surprising breadth in children’s reactions, expectations and strategies (as evidenced by their behaviour) and a noteworthy tolerance for the robot’s occasionally awkward behaviour.
Keyword Social Robot
Interaction
Design
Children
Ethnography
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2838793

 
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Created: Fri, 08 Jan 2016, 12:13:07 EST by Jason Weigel on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech