The feasibility of using questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior among inpatient adults with mental illness

Fraser, Sarah J., Chapman, Justin J., Brown, Wendy, Whiteford, Harvey A. and Burton, Nicola (2016) The feasibility of using questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior among inpatient adults with mental illness. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 13 5: 551-557. doi:10.1123/jpah.2015-0223


Author Fraser, Sarah J.
Chapman, Justin J.
Brown, Wendy
Whiteford, Harvey A.
Burton, Nicola
Title The feasibility of using questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior among inpatient adults with mental illness
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2016-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2015-0223
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 13
Issue 5
Start page 551
End page 557
Total pages 7
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:  The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using questionnaires and accelerometers to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior among inpatient adults with mental illness.

Methods:  Participants completed a physical activity and sitting time questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for seven consecutive days. Feasibility was assessed in terms of participant engagement, self-reported ease/difficulty of completing study components, extreme self-report data values and adherence to accelerometer wear time criteria. Ease/difficulty ratings were examined by level of distress.

Results:  177 inpatients were invited to the study, 101 completed the questionnaires and 36 provided valid accelerometry data. Participants found it more difficult to complete sitting time and physical activity questionnaires than to wear the accelerometer during waking hours (z=3.787, p<0.001; z=2.824, p=0.005 respectively). No significant differences were found in ease/difficulty ratings by level of distress for any of the study components. Extreme values for self-reported sitting time were identified in 27% of participants.

Conclusion:  Inpatient adults with mental illness can engage with self-report and objective methods of measuring physical activity and sedentary behavior. They were initially less willing to participate in objective measurement, which may however be more feasible than self-report measures.
Keyword Exercise
Psychiatric
Data collection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 07 Jan 2016, 11:57:11 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences