The functionality of Leximancer software as an analytic tool for semi-structured interviews data exploring evidence-based policy in practice from the perspectives of academic social scientists and policymakers.

Povey, Jenny, Shaw, Elizabeth, Head, Brian, Cherney, Adrian, Boreham, Paul and Ferguson, Michele (2013). The functionality of Leximancer software as an analytic tool for semi-structured interviews data exploring evidence-based policy in practice from the perspectives of academic social scientists and policymakers.. In: AMSRS Conference, Sydney, Australia, (). 5-6 September 2013.

Author Povey, Jenny
Shaw, Elizabeth
Head, Brian
Cherney, Adrian
Boreham, Paul
Ferguson, Michele
Title of paper The functionality of Leximancer software as an analytic tool for semi-structured interviews data exploring evidence-based policy in practice from the perspectives of academic social scientists and policymakers.
Conference name AMSRS Conference
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 5-6 September 2013
Convener AMSRS
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
Total pages 21
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The paper has a dual purpose, to explore the practice of evidence-based policy from the perspectives of academic social scientists and policy personnel and to explore the functionality of Leximancer as an analytic tool for semi-structured interview data. Relational content analysis using Leximancer software was undertaken of 208 1-hour interviews with academic social scientists and policy personnel. Using this software not only expedited the analysis process, it increased reliability, reduced bias, and facilitated reproducibility. It also enabled two independent researchers to analyse the data simultaneously while focusing on two separate research questions, namely, how can the level of understanding between policy-makers and academics be fostered and what impact does academic research have on policymaking. Two approaches were used: profiling to explore understanding and sentiment analysis using compound concepts to explore impact. The results indicated that policy-makers felt that academic researchers lacked an understanding of government processes and needs, while academic researchers thought government needed to direct research projects more effectively. Policy-makers indicated the desire to influence the research at the initiation stage of the project. Further, both academic researchers and policy-makers indicated that organisational priorities and dynamics made it difficult to develop projects that benefited both parties. Both academic researchers and policy-makers could recount successful projects that impacted policy and suggested dissemination strategies such as summaries on websites, forums, and well-written reports. Personal contacts within government were linked to successful uptake of research. A lack of incentives in academia hindered academic researchers from devoting time to impact policy. In the policy arena, there is a sentiment that research should have a stronger impact on policy decision-making than it does.
Keyword Leximancer
Text analytics
Evidence-based policy
Impact
Understanding
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 05 Jan 2016, 16:30:17 EST by Jenny Povey on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research