Perceived anxiety control is associated with sleep disturbance in young and older adults

Gould, Christine E., Beaudreau, Sherry A., O'Hara, Ruth and Edelstein, Barry A. (2015) Perceived anxiety control is associated with sleep disturbance in young and older adults. Aging and Mental Health, 20 8: 856-860. doi:10.1080/13607863.2015.1043617


Author Gould, Christine E.
Beaudreau, Sherry A.
O'Hara, Ruth
Edelstein, Barry A.
Title Perceived anxiety control is associated with sleep disturbance in young and older adults
Journal name Aging and Mental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1364-6915
1360-7863
Publication date 2015-05-29
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13607863.2015.1043617
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 20
Issue 8
Start page 856
End page 860
Total pages 5
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study examined the extent to which perceived anxiety control was related to subjective sleep disturbance in young and older adults.

Method: Fifty-one young adults (18 to 30 years old) and 48 older adults (aged 65 years and older) completed questionnaires including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to assess sleep disturbance, Anxiety Control Questionnaire to assess perceived control over anxiety, a perceived health rating, and demographic questionnaire. Correlation and multivariable adjusted hierarchical regression analyses examined the extent to which anxiety control was associated with sleep disturbance.

Results: Anxiety control and health status were associated with global sleep quality on the PSQI, but no age differences in PSQI scores were found. In post hoc analyses, greater anxiety control was related to shorter sleep latency. Both older age and greater anxiety control were associated with less daytime dysfunction, whereas only older age was associated with better sleep quality.

Discussion: Although some variations in sleep quality by age were found, overall findings suggest that perceived anxiety control contributes to sleep disturbance in young and older adults. Greater anxiety control could lead to shorter sleep latency through reduced anxiety and worry symptoms at bedtime. Future studies should examine whether improved anxiety control with psychological treatments is one mechanism through which beneficial and lasting effects on sleep disturbance can be achieved.
Keyword Anxiety
Coping
Perceived control
Self-efficacy
Sleep problems
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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