Anti-social or intensively sociable? The local context of neighbour disputes and complaints among social housing tenants

Cheshire, Lynda and Buglar, Shannon (2015) Anti-social or intensively sociable? The local context of neighbour disputes and complaints among social housing tenants. Housing Studies, 1-20. doi:10.1080/02673037.2015.1122743


Author Cheshire, Lynda
Buglar, Shannon
Title Anti-social or intensively sociable? The local context of neighbour disputes and complaints among social housing tenants
Journal name Housing Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1466-1810
0267-3037
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02673037.2015.1122743
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract The prevalence of neighbour disputes among social housing tenants is often seen as the outcome of social residualisation and the physical characteristics of social housing. While such explanations have usefully drawn attention to the structural sources of problem neighbours in the social housing sector, rather than reduce them to the anti-sociality of tenants, this work has been disconnected from a consideration of the social and interactive contexts of neighbouring more broadly and its influence on how neighbour problems emerge and are managed in specific situations. In response, this paper examines the conditions that lead to the formation of a distinct style of neighbouring among social housing tenants, one that is prone to conflict and tension because of its intensively sociable, as opposed to anti-social, nature. Drawing on mediation data from Dispute Resolution Centres in Queensland, Australia, this paper illustrates how intensive modes of neighbouring combine with disadvantage and close physical proximity to create the conditions for neighbour problems to arise.
Keyword Neighbours
Disputes
Social housing
Anti-social behaviour
Neighbourliness
Housing policy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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