Remote versus face-to-face delivery of early intervention programs for children with autism spectrum disorders: Perceptions of rural families and service providers

Ashburner, Jill, Vickerstaff, Sandy, Beetge, Julie and Copley, Jodie (2016) Remote versus face-to-face delivery of early intervention programs for children with autism spectrum disorders: Perceptions of rural families and service providers. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 23 1-14. doi:10.1016/j.rasd.2015.11.011


Author Ashburner, Jill
Vickerstaff, Sandy
Beetge, Julie
Copley, Jodie
Title Remote versus face-to-face delivery of early intervention programs for children with autism spectrum disorders: Perceptions of rural families and service providers
Journal name Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1878-0237
1750-9467
Publication date 2016-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.rasd.2015.11.011
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA,United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract To date, research investigating the use of remote technologies to extend face-to-face early intervention services for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is limited. This study explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of a follow-up early intervention service delivered via remote technology, as compared to previous face-to-face services. The remote technology service focused on parent coaching rather than direct intervention with the child. A generic method of qualitative enquiry involving semi-structured interviews was used to explore the experiences of four rurally-based parents of children with ASD, eight rurally-based service providers, and a metropolitan-based ASD-specialist in regards to their participation in remote technology and face-to-face services. Qualitative content analysis revealed that the parents, service providers and the ASD-specialist perceived remote technologies to be beneficial in: (a) upskilling of parents and local service provider; (b) reducing cost, time and travel; (c) flexible, regular, ongoing support; (d) enabling families to access support from home, and (e) enhancing connections between team members. However, the participants were often frustrated by technical difficulties, and all agreed that remote technology should augment rather than replace face-to-face contact. This study provides preliminary support for the use of remote technologies to extend early intervention services for children with ASD.
Keyword Autism spectrum disorders
Early intervention
Parent coaching
Remote technology
Telehealth
Telemedicine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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