Low-tech recycling strategy for the production of building materials for developing nations

White, Claire A., Wood, Jessica C., Milne, John and Heitzmann, Michael T. (2015). Low-tech recycling strategy for the production of building materials for developing nations. In: Dilum Fernando, Jin-Guang Teng and Jose L. Torero, Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Performance-based and Life-cycle Structural Engineering (PLSE 2015). International Conference on Performance-based and Life-cycle Structural Engineering, Brisbane Australia, (100-108). 9-11 December 2015. doi:10.14264/uql.2016.418

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Author White, Claire A.
Wood, Jessica C.
Milne, John
Heitzmann, Michael T.
Title of paper Low-tech recycling strategy for the production of building materials for developing nations
Conference name International Conference on Performance-based and Life-cycle Structural Engineering
Conference location Brisbane Australia
Conference dates 9-11 December 2015
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Performance-based and Life-cycle Structural Engineering (PLSE 2015)
Place of Publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher School of Civil Engineering, The University of Queensland
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.14264/uql.2016.418
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
ISBN 9781742721477
Editor Dilum Fernando
Jin-Guang Teng
Jose L. Torero
Start page 100
End page 108
Total pages 9
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Increasing plastic production and lack of adequate recycling in developing nations is a critical global issue which must be addressed. This paper forms part of a larger feasibility study investigating a small scale plastic recycling plant housed in a shipping container for use in developing nations. The overall project is motivated by the desire to provide a cleaner environment, self sustained communities and reduce the impact of plastics on our society. Itis envisaged that the recycled mixed plastic product will be of use to the community by way of rudimentary building materials such as bricks and tiles. The concept has the potential to benefit communities in developing nations by providing secure and reliable accommodation whilst also utilising an untapped and abundant resource. This paper details the experimental component of the larger study and presents the manufacturing techniques utilised, the samples produced and resulting properties. The effects of filler materials on thermoplastic polymers are investigated in addition to the comparison of recycled and virgin polymers. It was determined that the status of the polymer used in the manufacture of samples (i.e. whether the polymer was virgin or recycled) had no significant effect on selected properties of material produced and that overall recycled PET produced the most consistently high performing sample materials. The PET samples produced had low water absorption, the highest average tensile strengths and medium impact resistance (compared to the other materials). They also exhibited the smallest decrease in tensile properties as a result of UV exposure and had no observed surface degradation. In addition, PET bottles are some of the most frequently occurring plastic wastes. A number of additional conclusions were made and are contained within this paper.
Keyword Sustainable design
Recycling
Thermoplastics
Filler materials
Developing nations
Building materials
Environment
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 23 Dec 2015, 11:05:15 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech