Back to basics: An audit of measurement of infant growth at presentation to hospital

Williams, Lesley Alison, Ware, Robert S. and Davies, Peter S. W. (2015) Back to basics: An audit of measurement of infant growth at presentation to hospital. Australian Health Review, 39 5: 539-543. doi:10.1071/AH14165


Author Williams, Lesley Alison
Ware, Robert S.
Davies, Peter S. W.
Title Back to basics: An audit of measurement of infant growth at presentation to hospital
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1449-8944
0156-5788
Publication date 2015-04-07
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH14165
Volume 39
Issue 5
Start page 539
End page 543
Total pages 5
Place of publication Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives. Infants who present or are admitted to hospital with illness or with inadequate growth and development are those most at risk of decreased nutritional status. However, not all infants who present or are admitted to hospital have their growth assessed. The aim of the present study was to identify how frequently anthropometric measurements were documented in charts of infants presenting and/or admitted to a tertiary paediatric hospital.

Methods. A systematic random sample of hospital charts of infants who had presented to the emergency department between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012 was audited retrospectively for the presence of appropriate documentation of measurement.

Results. In all, 465 charts were audited, representing 10% of infants who presented to the emergency department in the year. The frequency of anthropometric measures was: birthweight 103 (22%), presentation weight 275 (59%), length 8 (2%), head circumference 15 (3%), percentiles 27 (6%) and body mass index score 1 (0%). Age of the infant was significantly associated with recording of birthweight. There were no significant relationships found between gender, socioeconomic status, gestational age, delivery type and recording of diagnosis and birthweight.

Conclusions. Infant measurements were not recorded on many occasions. Assessment of growth as a marker of illness or nutritional deficit has been poorly assessed in this group. This is a missed opportunity to assess infant growth in this population, which has been found to be at risk of decreased nutritional status. Identification and treatment of growth deficits are a cost-effective method of optimising infant health worldwide.
Keyword developed countries
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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