Intensive versus distributed aphasia therapy: a nonrandomized, parallel-group, dosage-controlled trial

Dignam, Jade, Copland, David, McKinnon, Eril, Burfein, Penni, O'Brien, Kate, Farrell, Anna and Rodriguez, Amy D. (2015) Intensive versus distributed aphasia therapy: a nonrandomized, parallel-group, dosage-controlled trial. Stroke, 46 8: 2206-2211. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009522

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Author Dignam, Jade
Copland, David
McKinnon, Eril
Burfein, Penni
O'Brien, Kate
Farrell, Anna
Rodriguez, Amy D.
Title Intensive versus distributed aphasia therapy: a nonrandomized, parallel-group, dosage-controlled trial
Journal name Stroke   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0039-2499
1524-4628
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.009522
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 46
Issue 8
Start page 2206
End page 2211
Total pages 6
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2016
Formatted abstract
Background and Purpose: Most studies comparing different levels of aphasia treatment intensity have not controlled the dosage of therapy provided. Consequently, the true effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation remains unknown. Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy is an intensive, comprehensive aphasia program. We investigated the efficacy of a dosage-controlled trial of Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy, when delivered in an intensive versus distributed therapy schedule, on communication outcomes in participants with chronic aphasia.

Methods: Thirty-four adults with chronic, poststroke aphasia were recruited to participate in an intensive (n=16; 16 hours per week; 3 weeks) versus distributed (n=18; 6 hours per week; 8 weeks) therapy program. Treatment included 48 hours of impairment, functional, computer, and group-based aphasia therapy.

Results: Distributed therapy resulted in significantly greater improvements on the Boston Naming Test when compared with intensive therapy immediately post therapy (P=0.04) and at 1-month follow-up (P=0.002). We found comparable gains on measures of participants' communicative effectiveness, communication confidence, and communication-related quality of life for the intensive and distributed treatment conditions at post-therapy and 1-month follow-up.

Conclusions: Aphasia Language Impairment and Functioning Therapy resulted in superior clinical outcomes on measures of language impairment when delivered in a distributed versus intensive schedule. The therapy progam had a positive effect on participants' functional communication and communication-related quality of life, regardless of treatment intensity. These findings contribute to our understanding of the effect of treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation and have important clinical implications for service delivery models.
Keyword Aphasia
Intensity
Language
Neuroplasticity
Rehabilitation
Speech therapy
Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 14 Dec 2015, 09:30:59 EST by Jade Dignam on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences