Factors associated with the prevalence of hypertension in the southeastern united states insights from 69 211 blacks and whites in the southern community cohort study

Sampson, Uchechukwu K. A., Edwards, Todd L., Jahangir, Eiman, Munro, Heather, Wariboko, Minaba, Wassef, Mariam G., Fazio, Sergio, Mensah, George A., Kabagambe, Edmond K., Blot, William J. and Lipworth, Loren (2014) Factors associated with the prevalence of hypertension in the southeastern united states insights from 69 211 blacks and whites in the southern community cohort study. Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, 7 1: 33-54. doi:10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000155


Author Sampson, Uchechukwu K. A.
Edwards, Todd L.
Jahangir, Eiman
Munro, Heather
Wariboko, Minaba
Wassef, Mariam G.
Fazio, Sergio
Mensah, George A.
Kabagambe, Edmond K.
Blot, William J.
Lipworth, Loren
Title Factors associated with the prevalence of hypertension in the southeastern united states insights from 69 211 blacks and whites in the southern community cohort study
Journal name Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1941-7705
1941-7713
Publication date 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.113.000155
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 7
Issue 1
Start page 33
End page 54
Total pages 22
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background—Lifestyle and socioeconomic status have been implicated in the prevalence of hypertension; thus, we evaluated factors associated with hypertension in a cohort of blacks and whites with similar socioeconomic status characteristics.

Methods and Results—We evaluated the prevalence and factors associated with self-reported hypertension (SR-HTN) and ascertained hypertension (A-HTN) among 69 211 participants in the Southern Community Cohort Study. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with hypertension. The prevalence of SR-HTN was 57% overall. Body mass index was associated with SR-HTN in all race-sex groups, with the OR rising to 4.03 (95% CI, 3.74–4.33) for morbidly obese participants (body mass index, >40 kg/m2). Blacks were more likely to have SR-HTN than whites (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.75–1.93), and the association with black race was more pronounced among women (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.95–2.21) than men (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.36–1.60). Similar findings were noted in the analysis of A-HTN. Among those with SR-HTN and A-HTN who reported use of an antihypertensive agent, 94% were on at least one of the major classes of antihypertensive agents, but only 44% were on ≥2 classes and only 29% were on a diuretic. The odds of both uncontrolled hypertension (SR-HTN and A-HTN) and unreported hypertension (no SR-HTN and A-HTN) were twice as high among blacks as whites (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.68–2.69; and OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.59–2.48, respectively).

Conclusions—Despite socioeconomic status similarities, we observed suboptimal use of antihypertensives in this cohort and racial differences in the prevalence of uncontrolled and unreported hypertension, which merit further investigation.
Keyword African Continental Ancestry Group
European Continental Ancestry Group
Hypertension
Prevalence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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