The Brisbane effect: GOMA and the architectural competition for a new institutional building

Stead, Naomi (2015). The Brisbane effect: GOMA and the architectural competition for a new institutional building. In: Paul Hogben and Judith O'Callahan, Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 32, Architecture, Institutions and Change. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (627-639). 7-10 July 2015.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Stead, Naomi
Title of paper The Brisbane effect: GOMA and the architectural competition for a new institutional building
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 7-10 July 2015
Convener SAHANZ
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand: 32, Architecture, Institutions and Change
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher SAHANZ
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9780646942988
Editor Paul Hogben
Judith O'Callahan
Volume 32
Start page 627
End page 639
Total pages 13
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper will consider the use of architecture to build a particular institution, both literally and figuratively – Queensland’s Gallery of Modern Art. Procured via an open, international, two-stage competition held in 2002, the commission was eventually won by Lindsay and Kerry Clare with Davenport Campbell, who designed the building that was completed in 2006. Part of the museum collection as much as it provides space for exhibition, the resultant GOMA building both contains and manifests the identity of the institution. But more than that, the building is also frequently framed as part of an authentic local architectural tradition, as responsive to the characteristics of the sub-tropical climate, expressed through architectural gestures such as an expressive verandah roof. But in all its apparent place-specificity, the GOMA building can be seen in a much longer historic continuum of attempts to make culture visible in a state defined by its lack, underscored by an economy based on ‘crops and rocks’. The growing contemporary attachment of Queensland cultural institutions and architecture to notions of climate and place thus inverts earlier tensions between architecture, climate and culture in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. But the paper goes beyond old ‘Brisbane versus Melbourne’ debates through an examination not only of the completed GOMA building, but also the architectural competition, examining whether the competition itself predicated a museum building that would express place, manifest identity, and build the institution through architecture. GOMA offers a fascinating example of converging discourses of art and architecture, state policy, identity, and the role of ‘place’ in constituting the museum as institution.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 11 Dec 2015, 10:36:18 EST by Dr Naomi Stead on behalf of School of Architecture