A detailed analysis of the interfaces required for integrating UQ Racing’s Formula SAE engine into The University of Queensland’s Dynamometer facility

Longrich, Zino (2013). A detailed analysis of the interfaces required for integrating UQ Racing’s Formula SAE engine into The University of Queensland’s Dynamometer facility Honours Thesis, School of Engineering, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Longrich, Zino
Thesis Title A detailed analysis of the interfaces required for integrating UQ Racing’s Formula SAE engine into The University of Queensland’s Dynamometer facility
School, Centre or Institute School of Engineering
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Bo Feng
Total pages 61
Language eng
Subjects 0913 Mechanical Engineering
Formatted abstract
Formula SAE is a national and international competition were students must develop and design small open wheel race cars. In 2012 research was undertaken into utilising the UQ engine test facility to be used by UQ Racing to help develop their FSAE engine. Research by Michael Walters found that the AG150 eddy current dynamometer is well suited for small engine testing. Recommendations were put forward to further investigate key interface for integrating the UQR engine with the UQ test facility.

This thesis covered a review of the background concepts and conceptual designs put forward my M. Walters. The review covered the drive mechanism, test stand and fuel system as well as ventilation air, cooling system and exhaust extraction. Based on the review, a detailed analysis was then made of the critical components. This covered the design requirements, a description of the final design and an evaluation of the final product.

The preliminary drive shaft design was comprehensive and only minor changes were made to the selection of components. The design was re-evaluated for strength vibration and operating speeds. Significant changes were made to the test stand concept and the final design consisted of a trolley and engine cradle for testing. An FEA analysis was performed to assess the design. Cooling and exhaust systems as well as throttle actuation where found to be simple connection tasks. A brief evaluation was performed to ensure the systems had appropriate duty cycles to facilitate testing.

Final evaluation of the drive shaft found that selection of a combined FSAE 1410 and 1310 cardan shaft would be suitable for UQ Racings application. Final selection of the drive shaft is recommended to include advice from both Doug Malcolm and the relevant supplier. The test stand was found to be sufficiently strong and stiff to withstand testing and the design allowed for interfacing of alternate designs. A detailed analysis of the test stand is recommended prior to fabrication to cover more detailed load cases. A fuel system replicating the installed infrastructure was found to be the best solution. A major concern was the need to re-certify the test cell if a second fuel system is installed. The cooling and exhaust extraction systems were found to be over powered for FSAE applications but proved well suited for testing UQ Racings engine.
Keyword Formula SAE Engine

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Thu, 10 Dec 2015, 13:24:50 EST by Asma Asrar Qureshi on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service