Using individual householder survey responses to predict household environmental outcomes: the cases of recycling and water conservation

Fielding, Kelly S., van Kasteren, Yasmin, Louis, Winnifred, McKenna, Bernard, Russell, Sally and Spinks, Anneliese (2016) Using individual householder survey responses to predict household environmental outcomes: the cases of recycling and water conservation. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 106 90-97. doi:10.1016/j.resconrec.2015.11.009


Author Fielding, Kelly S.
van Kasteren, Yasmin
Louis, Winnifred
McKenna, Bernard
Russell, Sally
Spinks, Anneliese
Title Using individual householder survey responses to predict household environmental outcomes: the cases of recycling and water conservation
Journal name Resources, Conservation and Recycling   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-0658
0921-3449
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.resconrec.2015.11.009
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 106
Start page 90
End page 97
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Although individuals’ self-reports of behaviour are often used as a proxy for household environmental outcomes, little is known about how accurate they are or what factors might moderate accuracy. The current research investigated this question in relation to household recycling and water use. Results of Study 1 showed a significant, albeit weak, relationship between self-reported household recycling and objective measure of recycling that was not moderated by the number of people in the household. There was some evidence though that the relationship between self-reported and objective household recycling was stronger when respondents perceived more supportive community norms for recycling. The results of Study 2 supported Study 1 in showing a significant but weak relationship between self-reported water conservation behaviour and objective household water use that was again not moderated by the number of people in the house. Similar to Study 1, Study 2 showed that there was a stronger relationship between self-reported and objective behaviour when respondents had more favourable attitudes, more supportive subjective norms, and greater self-efficacy in relation to water conservation. Taken together the research suggests that psychological variables that orient householders to environmental behaviour are more important influences on aligning self-reported behaviour with objective outcomes than knowledge about the behaviour of others in the household.
Keyword Pro-environmental behaviour
Recycling
Water conservation
Self-reported behaviour
Objective behaviour
Household
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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